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Ear anatomy
Ear anatomy


Otoscope examination
Otoscope examination


Tympanometry

Definition:

Tympanometry is a test used to detect problems in the middle ear.



Alternative Names:

Tympanogram



How the test is performed:

Before the test, your health care provider will look inside your ear to make sure nothing is blocking the eardrum.

Next, a device is placed into your ear. This device changes the air pressure in your ear and makes the eardrum move back and forth. A machine records the results on graphs called tympanograms.



How to prepare for the test:

You should not move, speak, or swallow during the test. Such movements can change the pressure in the middle ear and give incorrect test results.

The sounds heard during the test may be loud. This may be startling. You will need to try very hard to stay calm and not get startled during the test. If your child is to have this test done, it may be helpful to show how the test is done using a doll. The more you child knows what to expect and why the test is done, the less nervous your child will be.



How the test will feel:

There may be some discomfort while the probe is in the ear, but no harm will result. You will hear a loud tone and feel pressure in your ear as the measurements are taken.



Why the test is performed:

This test measures how your ear reacts to sound and different pressures.



Normal Values:

The pressure inside the middle ear can vary by a very small amount. The eardrum should look smooth.



What abnormal results mean:

Tympanometry may reveal any of the following:

  • A tumor in the middle ear
  • Fluid in the middle ear
  • Impacted ear wax
  • Lack of contact between the conduction bones of the middle ear
  • Perforated ear drum
  • Scarring of the tympanic membrane


References:

Kerschner JE. Otitis media. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics.19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 632.

Casselbrant ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitismedia with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology:Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2010:chap194.




Review Date: 5/10/2013
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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