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In This Section Texas Health Plano
Scoliosis and Spine Tumor Center

Other Spinal Deformities

Physicians on the medical staff at the Scoliosis and Spine Tumor Center at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano also treat non-scoliosis spinal deformities. These conditions include kyphosis, spondylolisthesis and post-traumatic conditions.

Kyphosis is a curving of the spine that causes a bowing of the back.

Kyphosis
Kyphosis is a curving of the spine that causes a bowing of the back. The condition is classified as either postural or structural. Postural means the kyphosis is attributed to poor posture, usually presenting a smooth curve, which can be corrected by the patient. Structural kyphosis is caused by an abnormality affecting the bones, intervertebral discs, nerves, ligaments or muscles. Kyphosis due to a structural cause may require medical intervention because the patient alone cannot control curve progression.

Causes of kyphosis include:

  • Degenerative disease (such as arthritis)
  • The wedging together of several bones of the spine (vertebrae) in a row (in adolescents)
  • Fractures caused by osteoporosis
  • Diseases such as muscular dystrophy, polio and spina bifida
  • Congenital defect

As with all conditions treated at the Scoliosis and Spine Tumor Center, the goal for treating kyphosis is to provide the most appropriate and least invasive treatment to improve the patient's condition and quality of life. Surgery for abnormal kyphosis is usually the last treatment option tried; non-surgical treatments, such as physical therapy, are usually first recommended. If the pain and other symptoms do not lessen after several months of non-surgical treatments, the doctor may suggest surgery.

Spondylolisthesis
Spondylolisthesis is a condition in which a bone (vertebra) in the lower part of the spine slips forward in front of the bone below it. In children, spondylolisthesis is often due to a birth defect in the lower part of the back; in adults, the most common cause of the condition is an age related degenerative process, such as arthritis. Other causes include stress fractures and traumatic fractures, often as the result of very physical sports, such as football, gymnastics or weightlifting.

As with all conditions treated at the Scoliosis & Spine Tumor Center, the goal for treating spondylolisthesis is to provide the most appropriate and least invasive treatment to improve the patient's condition and quality of life. Surgery for abnormal spondylolisthesis is usually the last treatment option tried; non-surgical treatments, such as physical therapy, are usually first recommended. If the pain and other symptoms do not lessen after several months of non-surgical treatments, the doctor may suggest surgery.

At Texas Health Plano's Scoliosis and Spine Tumor Center, experienced surgeons perform innovative less invasive spine surgery for appropriate spondylolisthesis patients. Less invasive surgery provides more cosmetically acceptable scars, a shorter hospital stay and a quicker recovery.

Post-traumatic conditions
Trauma to the spinal cord and column can be a devastating injury with multiple complications including post-traumatic deformity. Appropriate imaging is used to diagnose a post-traumatic deformity.

As with all conditions treated at Texas Health Plano's Scoliosis and Spine Tumor Center, the goal for treatment is to provide the most appropriate and least invasive treatment to improve the patient's condition and quality of life. Surgical intervention may be required if the deformity is progressive or if there is a new onset or progression of a neurologic deficit. Less invasive surgery, which offers more cosmetically acceptable scars, a shorter hospital stay and a quicker recovery, may be appropriate for some patients with post-traumatic deformities.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 1-877-500-5454.

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