Español
PrintEmail
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)
In This Section Texas Health Research & Education Institute
Research

Information for Participants

Approximately 200 clinical trials are currently being conducted across the Texas Health Resources system. Study topics range across the clinical research spectrum.

Texas Health Resources is committed to promoting the rights and welfare of all research subjects who participate in research activities across the system. 

Following are frequently asked questions about research and your rights as a research participant at Texas Health resources.

What is research?

What is a clinical trial?

Why volunteer for a clinical trial?

How are volunteers protected?

Who reviews and approves research at Texas Health?

Is participation in clinical studies voluntary?

Can participants end their participation in a clinical trial?

What are my rights as a human research participant?

What is research?
Research means a systematic, or planned, investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge (meaning the results of a study are applicable to other populations and/or to the population of interest in general). The research process includes development, testing and evaluation of the findings.

What is a clinical trial?
Clinical trial is the scientific term for a test or study of a drug or medical device in people. These tests are done to see if the product is safe and effective for people to use. Doctors and other health professionals run the tests according to strict rules set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA sets the rules to ensure that people who agree to be in the studies are treated as safely as possible.

Why volunteer for a clinical trial?
By participating in a clinical trial, you can potentially try a new treatment that may or may not be better than those that already exist. You can also help others better understand how the treatment works in people of different races and genders.

How are volunteers protected?
To help you decide if you want to be in a study, the FDA requires that you be given complete information about the study before you agree to participate. This is known as informed consent. Before you can be in the study, you must sign the informed consent form, showing that you have been given this information and understand it. The informed consent form is not a contract. You can leave the study at any time, for any reason.

Who reviews and approves research at Texas Health?
Federal regulations require that a committee called the Institutional Review Board (IRB) review, approve and monitor all research involving human subjects. The IRB's goal is to protect the rights and welfare of human research participants. It monitors human subject research to determine that it is conducted ethically, and in compliance with federal regulations, state law and Texas Health Resources' policies and procedures.

IRB members include physicians, nurses, and community representatives, with Texas Health administration representatives also participating. Studies are submitted electronically at Texas Health, via the electronic Institutional Review Board (eIRB).

Is participation in clinical studies voluntary?
Research studies include only people who choose to participate. You should take your time to make your decision and discuss it with your friends, family and/or physician prior to deciding to participate in a research study. 

Can participants end their participation in a clinical trial?
Participation in a clinical trial is your decision. You may refuse to be in the trial or you may stop participation in a trial at any time. If you decide not to participate, or you withdraw, you will not have any penalty or loss of benefits to which you are entitled and this will not affect your future medical care.

What are my rights as a human research participant?

  • You have the right to refuse to take part in a research study without any penalty or loss of benefits to which you are otherwise entitled. Taking part in this research is your choice.
  • You have the right to drop out of a study at any time without any penalty or loss of benefits to which you are otherwise entitled.
  • You have the right to be given important new information that may affect your health, welfare, or willingness to stay in a research study.
  • You have the right to ask questions at any time and have them answered as soon as possible. 

For more information on clinical trials, visit these Web sites:

Online Tools

Locations

Helpful Info

Links