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Your baby is here. You're settled into a routine and hopefully getting a bit more sleep. Now it's only natural to want to see how your baby is doing compared to milestones.

Development varies from child to child, so milestones are only guidelines. Trust your sense of how your baby is doing. If you are worried, see your child's healthcare provider and have them do a developmental screening. Generally, keep a lookout for these milestones:

  • Squeaking and cooing: 1 to 5.3 months
  • Giving first smiles: 1 to 3 months
  • Rolling over: 4 to 7 months
  • Grasping toys: 2 to 4.5 months
  • Turning to objects of interest: 3 to 5 months
  • Teething to begin: 4 to 6 months
  • Eating solid foods: 4 to 6 months
  • Experiencing anxiety with strangers: 5 to 8 months
  • Sitting up: 5 to 7 months
  • Responding to his or her name: 6 to 10 months
  • Introducing sippy cups: 6 months
  • Playing peek-a-boo becomes a fun game: 7 months
  • Pulling up and walking along furniture: 9 months
  • Experimenting with sounds: 9 to 11 months
  • Saying first real words: 11 to 14 months

According to Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents, published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, seeing a range of behaviors at each age is normal. For example, at 2 months, most babies (more than 90 percent) will smile responsively; only some babies (50 to 90 percent) will smile spontaneously. While most 2-month-olds will vocalize, only some will laugh. The full range of behavior is normal.

If you'd like to talk to other moms about how they're handling the challenges of their babies first year, please visit the forums or our Facebook page.

Many moms face the baby blues. But feelings of depression, sadness or helplessness that linger for months could be a sign of greater difficulties. If you're concerned about yourself or a friend, contact your physician for more information. Texas Health Springwood Hospital can provide free assessment and help find resources in your community.

Some content was adapted from The Parent Review