Zachary McKenna, Ph.D.

Zachary McKenna, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow,
Thermal and Vascular Physiology Laboratory
Institute of Exercise and Environmental Medicine
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas

Contact Info

Zachary McKenna, Ph.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Internal Medicine
Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine
Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas
7232 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231
Office: 214-345-6557
Email: ZacharyMcKenna@TexasHealth.org

Highlighted Publications
  • The effect of interval and continuous work on markers of acute kidney injury in a hot environment
    The effect of interval and continuous work on markers of acute kidney injury in a hot environment. DOI: 10.1007/s00421-022-05030-1
  • Exercise in hypobaric hypoxia increases markers of intestinal injury and symptoms of gastrointestinal distress
    Exercise in hypobaric hypoxia increases markers of intestinal injury and symptoms of gastrointestinal distress. DOI: 10.1113/EP090266
  • High-altitude exposures and intestinal barrier dysfunction
    High-altitude exposures and intestinal barrier dysfunction. DOI: 10.1152/ajpregu.00270.2021
  • Exercise mitigates the Toll of muscle atrophy: a narrative review of the effects of exercise on Toll-like receptor-4 in leukocytes and skeletal muscle
    Exercise mitigates the Toll of muscle atrophy: a narrative review of the effects of exercise on Toll-like receptor-4 in leukocytes and skeletal muscle. DOI: 10.1152/ajpcell.00005.2022
  • Repeated sprint exercise in hypoxia stimulates HIF-1-dependent gene expression in skeletal muscle
    Repeated sprint exercise in hypoxia stimulates HIF-1-dependent gene expression in skeletal muscle. DOI: 10.1007/s00421-022-04909-3
  • Heat acclimation during low-intensity exercise increases VO2max and Hsp72, but not markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation, in skeletal tissue
    Heat acclimation during low-intensity exercise increases VO2max and Hsp72, but not markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation, in skeletal tissue. DOI: 10.1113/EP088563

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