COVID-19 Vaccine Information
COVID-19 Testing
The CDC recommends testing if you have symptoms of COVID-19 or have had close contact with someone who is COVID-19 positive.
What to Know About the Delta Variant
Learn more about this highly contagious strain and how you can help protect yourself and your loved ones.
Need a COVID-19 Test? Know Where to Go!

Antibody Treatment
Monoclonal Antibody Treatment
This treatment option could be right for you if you’ve tested positive for COVID-19.  
I Need Information about an Additional Dose or Booster of the Vaccine
The CDC recommends an additional dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine for immunocompromised individuals. More information about a booster shot is coming soon for all vaccinated individuals.

Texas Health locations are NOT currently giving additional doses or boosters of the vaccine. To find a vaccine location near you visit vaccines.gov.
  • Do I need an additional dose or a booster of the vaccine?

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a plan to begin offering a booster of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for people without weakened immune systems. They are recommending this be given eight months after the second dose. Their independent medical board will make additional recommendations this fall. Plans for people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be announced at a later date.

    For immunocompromised individuals, the CDC recommends an additional dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to be given at least four weeks after your second dose. (CDC)

  • Where can I get my additional dose of the vaccine?

    To find a vaccine location near you visit vaccines.gov.

    Texas Health locations are NOT currently giving additional doses or boosters of the vaccine.

  • Am I eligible for an additional dose or a booster?

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a plan to begin offering a booster of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for people without weakened immune systems. They are recommending this be given eight months after the second dose. Their independent medical board will make additional recommendations this fall. Plans for people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be announced at a later date.

    The CDC and FDA have approved administration of an additional dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine for immunocompromised individuals. This includes people who have:

    • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
    • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
    • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
    • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

    As always, you should talk to your healthcare provider about your specific medical condition before getting an additional dose of the vaccine. (CDC)

  • Who is considered immunocompromised?

    The CDC and FDA have approved administration of an additional dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine for immunocompromised individuals. This includes people who have:

    • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
    • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
    • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
    • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

    As always, you should talk to your healthcare provider about your specific medical condition before getting an additional dose of the vaccine. (CDC)

  • If I am immunocompromised and got the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine, do I need to get another dose?

    At this time, the CDC and FDA are only recommending an additional dose for immunocompromised individuals who received an mRNA vaccine (i.e. Pfizer and Moderna). (CDC). Plans for people who received the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be announced at a later date.

  • Can I mix and match vaccines for my additional dose or booster?

    You should get the same kind of vaccine for the additional dose or booster that you received for your first (i.e. if you received Pfizer for your first two doses, you should get Pfizer for your additional dose or booster).

    If the vaccine given for the first two doses is not available or is unknown, either Pfizer or Moderna may be given. (CDC)

    At this time, the CDC and FDA are only recommending additional dose for immunocompromised individuals who received an mRNA vaccine (i.e. Pfizer and Moderna). (CDC) Plans for people who received the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be announced at a later date.

  • If I don’t remember which vaccine I got, how can I find out?

    Download step-by-step instructions on the different ways you can get proof of vaccination.

  • When will a booster of the vaccine be approved for fully vaccinated individuals who are NOT immunocompromised? 

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a plan to begin offering a booster of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for people without weakened immune systems. They are recommending this be given eight months after the second dose. Their independent medical board will make additional recommendations this fall. Plans for people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be announced at a later date.

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I’m Ready to Get My First Dose of the Vaccine
Texas Health pop-up vaccine clinics are giving first and second doses of the vaccine, or you can visit vaccines.gov for more information on where you can get a vaccine in your community.

Texas Health locations are NOT currently giving additional doses or boosters of the vaccine. To find a vaccine location near you visit vaccines.gov.
  • Where can I get a vaccine near me?

    Texas Health pop-up vaccine clinics are giving first and second doses of the vaccine, or you can visit vaccines.gov for more information on where you can get a vaccine in your community.

    Texas Health locations are not currently giving additional doses or boosters of the vaccine.

  • Do I have to sign up for a vaccine?

    No. Most places are accepting walk-ins for vaccines. Some are also scheduling appointments if that works better for you. Find a vaccine location near you.

  • What can I expect on the day I get my vaccine?

    Getting the vaccine usually doesn’t take long. Wear clothes that make it easy for the vaccination staff to access the top of your arm. Follow instructions from the staff at the vaccination site when you arrive. Be prepared to stay around 15-minutes for observation after you get your vaccine to make sure you don’t have immediate reactions to the vaccine.

  • If I get the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, how do I get the second dose?

    In most cases you will schedule an appointment for your second dose when you get your first dose, or you will be told a date or dates when you can return for your second dose. If not, please contact the place where you received your first dose for more information.

  • Will I have to take time off of work due to vaccine side effects?

    You might have mild to moderate side effects, but that is normal. Some people will experience side effects for a few days like pain or swelling in the arm, fever, chills, headaches and tiredness. This is normal, and just means your immune system is working. Some people do not have side effects.

  • What if I need a ride to get my vaccine?

    Uber and Lyft have options for free and discounted rides to vaccination sites.

  • How long does it take before the vaccines protect me? 

    It typically takes 2 weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. You are not fully vaccinated until 2 weeks after the second dose of a 2-dose vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (Johnson & Johnson). (CDC)

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I'm Healthy. Why Should I Get Vaccinated?
Caring for your community means first protecting your own health. The fact is that young and healthy people can still get seriously ill from COVID-19 and the emerging variants. Some schools are even requiring students to be fully vaccinated this school year. So, join the fight against COVID-19 and get vaccinated today for a safer tomorrow.
Why Should I Get Vaccinated?

  • Are the vaccines safe?

    The vaccines are proven to be safe. Thousands of people from diverse backgrounds were part of the large safety test trials. No shortcuts were taken when developing the vaccines. Career scientists and doctors, along with a separate committee, reviewed the safety and effectiveness from each manufacturer.*

    The CDC continues to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 12 years of age and older, given the risk of COVID-19 illness and related, possibly severe complications.** (CDC)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • Should I be concerned about the delta variant?

    Ongoing research is being conducted around COVID-19 and its variants. The CDC has labeled the delta variant a “variant of concern”. This means evidence indicates that delta has an increased rate of transmission and a higher probability of causing more severe symptoms (including symptoms that require hospitalization) and even an increase in deaths. Evidence also seems to suggest reduced effectiveness of COVID-19 antibodies, approved therapies and even vaccination against the delta variant. Studies show that those who have been vaccinated may become infected with COVID-19 or a variant like delta but are typically at a lower risk for severe symptoms, so it’s even more important now to get fully vaccinated to protect yourself and your loved ones. (CDC)

  • Why do I need to worry about the delta variant if I've had COVID-19?

    Recent studies show that vaccinated people who had COVID-19 are two to four times more protected against COVID-19 than unvaccinated people who also had COVID-19. This is also true for the much stronger delta strain. Texas Health recommends getting vaccinated even if you already had COVID-19 because data shows that COVID-19 vaccines offer better protection than natural immunity alone and can help prevent reinfections.

  • Should I get the vaccine if I’ve had COVID-19?

    Recent studies show that vaccinated people who had COVID-19 are two to four times more protected against COVID-19 than unvaccinated people who also had COVID-19. This is also true for the much stronger delta strain. Texas Health recommends getting vaccinated even if you already had COVID-19 because data shows that COVID-19 vaccines offer better protection than natural immunity alone and can help prevent reinfections.

    Individuals who are known COVID-19 positive should wait to receive the vaccine until they are symptom free and no longer require isolation. For most people this is 14 days with no signs or symptoms. People who have had COVID-19 may want to check with their primary care provider to see when it is OK to start their vaccines.

  • Should I be worried about vaccine side effects?

    You might have mild side effects, but that is normal. Some people will experience side effects for a few days like pain or swelling in the arm, fever, chills, headaches and tiredness. This is normal, and just means your immune system is working. Some people do not have side effects.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • How quickly does the vaccine begin protecting me against COVID-19?

    It typically takes 2 weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. You are not fully vaccinated until 2 weeks after the second dose of a 2-dose vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (Johnson & Johnson). (CDC)

  • If I have an underlying health condition, should I get the vaccine?

    If you are immunocompromised, you may be at higher risk for severe COVID-19 illness due to underlying medical conditions and it is recommended that most people get the vaccine. Ask your doctor if you have questions.

    If you have certain underlying medical conditions, you may also have an increased risk for COVID-19, and it is highly recommended to get the vaccine.

    • Underlying medical conditions include but are not limited to: Cancer, diabetes, COPD, solid organ transplant recipients, heart failure, coronary artery disease, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, etc. (CDC)

    Severe illness is defined as individuals with COVID-19 who may require hospitalization, intensive care or mechanical ventilation.

  • Will the vaccine cause me to test positive for COVID-19?

    No. It is not possible to test positive for COVID-19 from the vaccines. The tests are looking for a current infection or antibodies that reflect a past infection, and the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines do not use the actual COVID-19 virus to trigger a person’s immune system to make protective antibodies against COVID-19. (CDC)

  • Do I need to continue wearing a mask if I am fully vaccinated?

    To maximize protection from the delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission. (CDC)

  • Can I choose which COVID-19 vaccine I get?

    Yes. Visit vaccines.gov to find a location near you offering the kind of vaccine you want (Pfizer, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson).

  • Should I get the vaccine if I am pregnant? 

    The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Society for Maternal and Fetal Medicine both recommend that people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to be pregnant receive a COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine series.

    Similarly, the CDC also recommends vaccination for all people 12 and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding or wanting to start a family. According to the CDC website, “evidence about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy has been growing. These data suggest that the benefits of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine outweigh any known or potential risks of vaccination during pregnancy.” Additionally, the CDC also indicates that there is currently no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems in women or men.

    Individuals should consult their physician for questions specific to their situation.

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I Need More Information
  • Is the vaccine effective against COVID-19 variants like the delta variant?

    COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at preventing COVID-19 disease, especially severe illness and death. Current information suggests that the vaccine offers protection against most COVID-19 variants. However, it is possible that some variants could cause illness in people who are fully vaccinated. (CDC)

  • Should I get the vaccine if I’ve had COVID-19?

    Recent studies show that vaccinated people who had COVID-19 are two to four times more protected against COVID-19 than unvaccinated people who also had COVID-19. This is also true for the much stronger delta strain. Texas Health recommends getting vaccinated even if you already had COVID-19 because data shows that COVID-19 vaccines offer better protection than natural immunity alone and can help prevent reinfections.

    Individuals who are known COVID-19 positive should wait to receive the vaccine until they are symptom free and no longer require isolation. For most people this is 14 days with no signs or symptoms. People who have had COVID-19 may want to check with their primary care provider to see when it is OK to start their vaccines.

  • How were the vaccines tested?

    Clinical trials are evaluating investigational COVID-19 vaccines in tens of thousands of study participants to allow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to determine safety and effectiveness. These clinical trials are being conducted according to the FDA’s strong standards.

    The trials are conducted in three phases.

    • Phase 1: The vaccine is given to a small number of generally healthy people to assess its safety and to gain information about how well the vaccine works to induce an immune response.
    • Phase 2: Studies include more people with varying health statuses and from different demographic groups receiving various dosages. These studies provide additional safety information and may provide initial information regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine.
    • Phase 3: The vaccine is given to thousands of people in randomized, controlled studies involving broad demographic groups. Some people will receive the vaccine and some will not. This phase generates critical information on effectiveness and additional important safety data. (FDA)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • Are the vaccines safe?

    The vaccines are proven to be safe. Thousands of people from diverse backgrounds were part of the large safety test trials. No shortcuts were taken when developing the vaccines. Career scientists and doctors, along with a separate committee, reviewed the safety and effectiveness from each manufacturer.*

    The CDC continues to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 12 years of age and older, given the risk of COVID-19 illness and related, possibly severe complications.** (CDC)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • Were the vaccines made too quickly?

    No. Widespread trials with more than 113,000 people between the three vaccines showed they are safe and effective. No shortcuts were taken when developing the vaccines.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • Can I get COVID-19 from the vaccines?

    It is not possible to get COVID-19 from vaccines. The Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines do not use the actual COVID-19 virus to trigger a person’s immune system to make antibodies to protect you against COVID-19.

  • Will the vaccines change my DNA?

    No. COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

  • I’m worried about the side effects.

    You might have mild side effects, but that is normal. Some people will experience side effects for a few days like pain or swelling in the arm, fever, chills, headaches and tiredness. This is normal, and just means your immune system is working. Some people do not have side effects.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the Pfizer vaccine for people 16 and older. The vaccine, which will now be marketed as Comirnaty, continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA) for children 12-15 and for the administration of a third dose in immunocompromised people.

    Vaccines from Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available under a previously issued EUA.

  • Will the vaccines make me infertile?

    COVID-19 vaccines are not likely to present a risk if you are trying to become pregnant now or in the future. (CDC)

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COVID-19 VACCINE TRACKER

340,395

Total Doses Administered

60,189

Employees, Volunteers, Health Care Partners

280,206

Patient and Community Doses

Numbers above reflect systemwide activity for all doses administered through September 21, 2021.

Demographics for Patient and Community Doses Only

Race

White

77%

Black

13%

Asian

6%

Other

2%

Unknown

2%

Ethnicity

Non-Hispanic

79%

Hispanic

18%

Unknown

3%

Gender

Male

45%

Female

55%

Age

Age 75 and older

18%

Age 65-74

23%

Less than Age 65

59%

Percentages reflect vaccinations administered to patients and community members only.

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Misplaced your Vaccination Card?
There are several ways you can get your COVID-19 vaccine record.

 
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COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions
We know there are many questions about the COVID-19 vaccines, and we will continue to update the FAQs with new information.
 

*On April 23, 2021, the CDC and the FDA lifted the temporary pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. A safety review found that a very rare, but serious condition called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) can develop, causing blood clots and low blood platelets. Nearly all reports of this serious condition have been in adult women younger than 50 years old. Women younger than 50 years old should be aware of their increased chance of having TTS and that there are other COVID-19 vaccine options available for which this risk has not been seen. The CDC and FDA lifted the temporary pause because a review of the data found that the known and potential benefits of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine outweigh the known and potential risks of the vaccine.

**On June 23, 2021, the latest data on reports of mild cases of inflammation of the heart muscle and surrounding tissue called myocarditis and pericarditis following COVID-19 vaccination among younger people states that this is an extremely rare side effect, and only an exceedingly small number of people will experience it after vaccination. Importantly, for the young people who do, most cases are mild, and individuals recover often on their own or with minimal treatment. In addition, myocarditis and pericarditis are much more common if someone gets COVID-19, and the risks to the heart from COVID-19 infection can be more severe. (HHS)

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