Feeding at 6 Weeks

By now, breastfeeding should be a bit easier for both you and your little one. While it may not feel like a perfect rhythm just yet, you've probably figured out some things that work (and some that don’t!) while giving your baby breast milk. Congratulations on coming this far!

Your baby is probably gaining about a half a pound each week. The time between feedings may be spreading out to 2, 3 or occasionally even 4 hours. If your baby is breastfed, he may spend 15 to 20 minutes at each breast—sometimes suckling both, and sometimes just one.

Six weeks is also the time of a big growth spurt, so your baby may also be back to cluster feeding, or very frequent feeds. But don't worry. This is normal as he builds body weight.

Babies often have very frequent bowel movements in the first weeks of life, but you may see less of them starting around 6 weeks. One or 2 a day is normal for a breastfed baby, but it can also be normal for your baby to go only every few days.

Breast milk or formula is still all your baby needs at this age. Solid food, even baby cereal, is not recommended until at least 6 months. (If your baby has a family history of diabetes, it’s especially important to avoid giving her solid food before she’s 4 to 5 months old. Doing so has been shown to increase the risk of developing the disease.)

This message is not intended to provide individual medical advice. Always seek the advice of a physician or qualified healthcare provider for any questions you have about your health or medical condition, your breastfeeding issues and your infant's health. Never disregard, avoid or delay contacting a doctor or other qualified professional because of something you have read in our emails, webpages or other electronic communications.

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